The God of Amen (Isa 65: 16)

“These things saith the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the beginning of the creation of God” (Rev 3: 14)

Christ introduces himself as “the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the ruler of God’s creation”. This introduction defines what Christ wants the church to become. In each of the seven churches, Christ recommends an aspect of His personality to rebuke the churches. In consequence, He calls their attention to behold Him as a model for repentance. The church can only relate to Jesus by a clear revelation. The word “Amen” is of Hebrew root “āmēn” (אָמֵן) that signifies “truth” or “truly”. It appears several times in both Old and New Testaments of the Bible. Some think the word was adopted from the name of the Egyptian god of creation, “Amun”, whose totemic was a ram, and thus draw the parity with Jesus as “Amen”, the Creator of the world (Jn 1:1-3; Col 1: 15-20; Heb 1: 2). Other scholars think that connection is mere Afrocentric theory.

In the NT, ἀμήν “amen” appears in Mark 9:1 but in the same accounts, Luke uses the Greek adverb “alethos“, meaning “truly” (Luke 9:27) where the noun “aletheia” means “truth” (Jn 14: 6). The relevance of “Amen” to Jesus is clearly presented by Paul in 2 Cor 1: 18-20: “But as surely as God is faithful, our message to you is not “Yes” and “No.” For the Son of God, Jesus Christ, who was preached among you by us—by me and Silas and Timothy—was not “Yes” and “No,” but in him it has always been “Yes.” For no matter how many promises God has made, they are “Yes” in Christ. And so through him the “Amen” is spoken by us to the glory of God.”

The church of Laodicea is called upon to behold Christ as the Truth. Truth is a reality that acts upon us. We can only be true when we know the truth. Jesus as Truth leads us to live the realities of truth. If Laodicea could see Christ in this light, their predicament would be cured.

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